Mitchelton Garage Door Opener Repair Service

Things do not end with buying and installing a new garage door in Mitchelton. The thing is, it require proper care and maintenance for them to retain their top quality and condition. In fact, even if you purchased a topnotch brand and a heavy-duty material, it is still a must that you do the right things to care for your garage door. Here are some tips on door maintenance that will help you keep the door looking and working like it is brand new and minimising the need for garage door repairs.

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Garage Door Repair РProblems and Fixes in Mitchelton

My garage door will not open. What could be the problem?

1. Checking the springs on your garage door is the first thing you must do. On a sectional door, the springs are located on the header, above the door. Look for the long torsion tube that spans the width of the door, the springs should be right in the middle. Some doors can have up to 4 springs per door. To know your spring is broken, you will need to look for a crack in the coil or if the spring is sagging, you will know it needs to be replaced.

On a one piece door, the springs are easily visible on the side of the garage door. Make sure they are attached properly to the hinges and not hanging loose.

NEVER OPERATE A GARAGE DOOR WITH A BROKEN SPRING! If you have found that your spring is broken, call a local garage door technician to service it for you. Please note that when you replace a spring, you should replace all of the springs for that door.

2. The next thing you want to do is to check to see if your slide lock engaged or trolley lock (the red cord that hangs down from the motor rail) has been disengaged. The side locks are located on the insides of the garage door on one or both sides of the door. The trolley lock, or emergency release lock, is located on the motor rail. To reengage this motor, pull the red cord up and towards the door you will hear it latch into place and see that it is in a different lock position. Once the latch is pulled, the motor will become operable. If you want to disengage motor because your motor is broken pull down on the red cord trolley release.

3. The third thing you can do is to check your cables. The door cables are located on each side of the door and are connected to the torsion tube. Does the cable look like it is out of sync or not wound up correctly? Another easy way you can tell your cable is broken is that your door will look crooked in the opening.

4. The last thing you can do is to see if you have power going to your motor. It is quite common to have a fuse in your circuit breaker go bad. If your motor is not operating at all when you click on the wall button or your portable remotes, this might be the problem. Check your circuit breakers, plug another source into the outlet and if needed call an electrical technician.

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This is a D.I.Y. guide and can be performed by any one providing you have the correct tools:

1. 4mm Pin Punch.
2. Mole Grips.
3. Cable cutting tool such as snips or pliers.
4. Hammer.
5. Screwdrivers.
6. Set of steps.

To begin, if only one cable has snapped you will need to cut the cable on the other side to allow you to be able to replace both sides. If you still have tension in the spring then put the c-clip into the whole in the shaft to the left of the right hand side cone.

This should be supplied with your cones and cables repair kit.

Once this is in place you can cut the intact cable.

After cutting the cable you will need to climb up your steps and locate the 4mm pin which holds the cone in place on the shaft. When you have located this (you may need to rotate the shaft slightly to get access) take your hammer and 4mm pin punch and knock the pin all the way through and into the timber frame. I recommend you spray the end of the punch with some WD40 or similar so it is easier to pull back out when the pin is removed.

If the door is fitted between the opening then it is likely you will have to loosen the gear from the top of the frame to allow you to pull the cone from the shaft.

IMPORTANT: You MUST do one side at a time!

When you have the cone free, replace it with the new one and be sure to take the old pin out of the timber frame if it has jammed into it as it will be in the way if you do not! Don't replace the pin yet, leave the cone loose.

Refit the gear to the the frame.

Now go over to the other side and do the same.

Fitting the cable onto the pivot point.

When fitting the cable into the pivot point it is important to have the cables in the correct position otherwise the door will not open at all.

To do this put the pivot point through the loop. TIP: An easy way to do this is to unscrew the guide or runner and move it to one side, put the cable around the pivot point and re-fix the guide.

When done there will be some slack cable. Go back up to the cone and turn it towards you so that the slack cable wraps around the cone. When you have taken up the slack the the holes in the shaft and cone should match up. You can then knock the pin in. TIP: You may find it easier to knock the pin partially into the cone before taking up the slack cable as you will need to keep pulling the cone toward you until the pin is in. Alternatively, have an assistant hold the tension on the cone whilst you knock in the pin - be careful not to hit your assistants fingers with the hammer!

Now do the same on the other side.

If this is done correctly the left hand side pin should be at the 10 O'clock position and the right hand side should be at 2 O'clock.

The C clip can now be removed and the door should run up and down.

If the door is difficult to lift then you will have to put more tension on the spring. All up and over doors with cones and cables operate under the same principle but often there are slight differences from manufacturer to manufacturer but essentially you need to do the following:

About 2 feet in from the left hand side you will see a collar attached to the spring. This collar holds the spring tension to the centre shaft. If the collar has a nut type end then you should be able to hold the tension whilst undoing the screw(s) with an Allen Key. Once you have the spring under tension you then rotate the spring away from you (upwards). Depending on how much tension has been lost will depend on how many turns you need to give the spring. Generally speaking one movement is half a turn. Use a screwdriver or similar in the holes provided in the collar to rotate the spring. When the spring feels like it has gone as tight as it can go, hold the tension whilst tightening up the Allen Screws. Test the door slowly up and down. If it will not go all the way up without the cables going slack then you need to put more turns on the spring.

Finally, lubricate the guides and spray oil onto the spring also, this will help to keep any squeaking down and allow the door to move more freely.

You should allow a couple of hours to do this, although it can be done much quicker if the pins come out easily.

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